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FYSA Player Medical Release Form

Medical Release

Hollywood Wildcats Parental Code of Conduct Form

Code of Conduct

Hollywood Wildcats Zero Tolerance PolicyComing soon Zero Tolerance Policy
Waiver FormWaiver Form
Blank IRS W-9 Form

W9 Form

Sponsorship Packet

Sponsorship Packet

FYSA Code of Ethics FormFYSA Code of Ethics
Concussion Informed Consent Form Please click here
Possible Concussion Notification Please click here
Concussion Procedure and Protocol For US Youth Soccer Events Please click here
Dispute Resolution ProcedureComing soon

 

International Transfer Clearance (“ITC”)

BACKGROUND

Per FIFA's Regulations on the Status and Transfer of Players, the international clearance process is required when any foreign-born player over the age of 10 is attempting to register with an affiliated club in the United States, regardless of that player's ability or citizenship. U.S. Soccer is responsible for properly obtaining that clearance on behalf of these players before they can register and participate in an affiliated league.

INTERNATIONAL CLEARANCE OPTIONS

Under FIFA's rules, there are three options by which a players under the age of 18 born outside of the U.S. can register with an affiliated league.
  1. Proof of Entry Prior to 10 – Players who have entered the U.S. prior to the age of 10 (regardless of their current age) and have been continuously living in the country since moving, can supply a copy of an official document to prove that fact (e.g. report cards, doctor records, etc.).
  1. First Registration
    1. U.S. Citizens – U.S. citizens born outside the U.S. (regardless of current age) may simply complete and sign the First Registration form attesting that the player has never been registered at any level to play soccer in any other country. U.S. Soccer can immediately clear the player upon receipt of this document.
    2. Non-U.S. Citizens – A player born outside of the U.S., who is currently over the age of 18, may also complete and sign the First Registration form. U.S. Soccer will contact the foreign association for confirmation and will clear the player once that is received.
  1. Minors Process – Any player currently between the ages of 10 and 17 who is NOT eligible for one of the preceding methods must prove to U.S. Soccer that he/she meets one of the following exceptions:
    • The player has moved with his/her parents to the U.S. for reasons other than playing soccer (e.g. parent's work).

The chart below explains which process should be used, depending on the player's age:

 

Living in U.S. prior to age of 10

Moved to U.S. after age 10, but was never registered outside U.S.

Previously registered to club outside the U.S.

Age 10-17, U.S. Citizen

Prior to 10

First Registration

Minors Process

Age 10-17, Non-U.S. Citizen

Prior to 10

Minors Process

Minors Process

*Any foreign-born players under the age of 10 should also submit 'Proof of Entry Prior to 10' documentation to U.S. Soccer in order to receive immediate clearance.

Please contact U.S. Soccer Registration Department with any questions.


Financial Help Forms

Partial financial aid from the Hollywood Wildcat Soccer Club might be available to help lower the costs of registration for families who need assistance. However, we can only afford to provide aid to those families in real need. We ask that a payment schedule that is acceptable to both the Player and the Club be established. These payments help us cover the cost of the uniforms, referees, coaches and league fees. Whenever possible we appreciate that parents seeking financial help donate volunteer time.

We hope that newly increased sibling discounts and payment plan options for those in need will suffice most needing assistance. If all you need is some time pay the fees over 2-3 payments please send an e-mail to voucher@hollywoodwildcats.com with your request.

We follow Florida Food Assistance Program (SNAP) income guidelines when evaluating financial aid given. Income verification might be requested.

Household SizeMaximum Income Level (Per Year)
1$23,760
2$32,040
3$40,320
4$48,600
5$56,880
6$65,160
7$73,460
8*$81,780
In order to qualify, you must have an annual household income (before taxes) that is below the following amounts:
*For households with more than eight people, add $8,320 per additional person.

Complete an application form and return it to one of the Board members, an in-person interview may be required. No uniform or registration will be granted until this application has been completed and approved by the Board. Please, note that qualifying for aid in prior years is not a guarantee of automatic future qualification.

Recreational Program Financial Aid Form – Please Click Here
Travel Program Financial Aid Form – Please Click Here


What to Do When You Can't Afford Your Kid's Sport

Your child doesn't have to give up his travel soccer dreams. Try these ideas to lower the cost.

By Abby Hayes, Contributor | Aug. 21, 2014

As parents, we want to encourage our kids to dream big and to do what they love. And sports are an excellent way to boost a child’s confidence, get in some healthy activity and even have fun as a family. But before you sign up for Little League or the high school hockey team, it’s worth your while to think through the costs of a sport. Pay-to-play, added fees, meals at the baseball diamond, not to mention the equipment – these costs add up.Then if your child decides to pursue a sport, your bank account could really take a hit.With younger kids, cost tends to be less of an issue. But as your children get older, you may want to have conversations with them about the cost of their sport of choice. And if you’re finding your budget in a bind due to your multi-sport athlete, you may want to consider options for reducing participation costs.

Breaking Down the Costs

Costs for playing sports vary from sport to sport. The Kids Play USA Foundation tracks the average cost of sports around the nation and estimates that participation fees cost between $100 and $400 per child, per sport each season. Equipment costs also vary from sport to sport. With volleyball, for instance, players generally just need a uniform and some knee pads. Soccer requires cleats and shin guards, while baseball and softball require loads of equipment that can be quite expensive. Older athletes who don't grow as quickly may be able to wear the same pair of cleats for two years in a row. But younger kids will quickly outgrow everything from shorts and cleats to shin guards and knee pads. And even track and cross country, which is a relatively low-cost sport, will require new shoes on a regular basis.

Ways to Spend Less

None of this is to say that sports participation is a bad thing. In fact, plenty of research (and life experience) shows that athletics is great for kids – it gives them a chance to practice teamwork, make friends, solve problems and stay active.With that said, too many parents jump into every sport under the sun feet first with no thought to the financial, familial or physical consequences. Don’t be that parent! Instead, consider ways you can lower the cost of your child’s sports participation.

Try these ideas on for size:
  • Look for used equipment. Since equipment fees are one of the biggest financial factors for sports, look for high-quality used equipment on Craigslist or eBay. You could save a fortune with this single trick.
  • Raise money from local organizations. Often, local youth sports leagues are sponsored by local business owners. If your child’s current league doesn’t offer this, ask if you can approach local businesses for support yourself or organize fundraisers. Would your employer be willing to sponsor your child?
  • Volunteer for the Club. Most clubs are run by volunteer parents whose kids also play for the club. They could certainly use your help. Even if their financial aid funds are low, being on the inside might at least help you not miss application deadlines and find out what kind of assistance is even possible.
  • Have your child chip in. Is one of your young athletes showing serious potential and dedication to a particular sport? If he or she wants to participate in expensive travel or elite leagues, that’s great. But have your kid pitch in with the costs by getting a job in the offseason. Not only does this lighten the load a bit, but it also teaches your child about working for what he or she really wants.
Kids’ sports don’t have to completely break the bank, but you also don’t have to ban them. Healthy participation in youth sports just takes goals, boundaries and planning ahead.